Thursday, January 05, 2012

Happy (belated) New Year!

Another year, another list of 'resolutions'.  Welcome to twenty-twelve :)
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9 Comments:

Blogger Tim... said....

I was saying to Alex Nuijten in the comments to the following post, I really need to look at the MODEL clause some more. :)

http://nuijten.blogspot.com/2012/01/generate-multiple-rows.html

Cheers

Tim...

Thu Jan 05, 11:53:00 AM EST  

Blogger Laurent Schneider said....

Happy New Year Tom

I have learnt the new mode clause back in 10gR1. There has not be any further development or marketing on the "SQL for Modeling" since then, just some fixes, but no real enhancement, and the number of limitation (where you cannot use model) is still way to big.

Is Oracle still investing R&D on the topic? Or are you looking for a
CONNECT BY LEVEL replacement ;-)

Best wishes for 2012 to your family and yourself

Laurent

Thu Jan 05, 12:55:00 PM EST  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

@Laurent,

you'll see some things for sure in the next release with respect to model and analytics in general.

still worked on - definintely

Thu Jan 05, 12:56:00 PM EST  

Anonymous Sokrates said....

this list of evergreens should not only apply to every dba but also to every software developer, no matter which tools she/he uses
(just my thoughts on them)

Fri Jan 06, 06:15:00 AM EST  

OpenID instantkick said....

Happy new year to you too! I am not able to figure out the tool that generates report on database performance and also show sql statement and their problem area. Hope will figure out soon.

http://instantkick.blogspot.com

Sat Jan 07, 01:21:00 AM EST  

Blogger Denny de Jonge said....

Hi Tom,

I did a lot of research on the model-clause topic about 5 years ago. Oracle added a powerfull albeit quite complex and abstract capabilities to the SQL language. I consider it a procedural extension to SQL which is able to postprocess the results of a query.

Here's a small example of a model-clause empowered query. First a simple selection from dual is queried and the resulting row is extended by a model-clause by recursively compute the fibonacci number sequence and an estimation of the golden ratio. Try to achieve the same result in plain SQL without using any embedded procedural code like calls to stored procedures or table functions :-)

select i, to_char(fib) fib, phi golden_ratio
from (select 1 i from dual)
model
dimension by (i)
measures (1 fib, 1 phi)
rules upsert
( fib[1] = 1
, fib[2] = 1
, fib[for i from 3 to 200 increment 1] =
fib[cv(i)-1] + fib[cv(i)-2]
, phi[ANY]=fib[cv(i)]/fib[cv(i)-1]
)

Regards,
Denny

Mon Jan 09, 04:20:00 PM EST  

Anonymous Sokrates said....

Hallo Tom,

another Happy New Year to you !

Did you manage to fulfil your last-years-resolutions ?
Are you now a top expert for the model-clause in SQL ?

Matthias

Wed Jan 02, 08:19:00 AM EST  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

@Mattias

I have to admit that I'm not as competent at the MODEL clause as I'd like to be. Better than a year ago, but not what I would call proficient - still a little ways to go :)

Wed Jan 02, 08:21:00 AM EST  

Blogger RAJESH said....

Tom,

Will you be sharing your 2013 new year resolution with us?

Sun Jan 06, 09:39:00 PM EST  

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