Friday, May 26, 2006

Thanks No...

Thanks. No.

One of the “blogs” I watch (not read) is http://www.rocketboom.com/. This morning I was watching it and it started a little slow – but then I caught on.

Thanks. No.

I laughed out loud when I figured it out. http://thanksno.com/ - brilliant. It reminded me of a .signature I have configured in Thunderbird that reads:

Please do not take this personally, this is a generic response I send to direct questions.Please use http://asktom.oracle.com/ to ask me questions. When I have time, I accept them there. It is not a very scalable solution for me to answer individual questions in email. I cannot share these answers with many thousands of other Oracle users.You must understand there are many thousands of people like you and there is really only one of me (I am not a team, a group, or anything like that -- there is really just me). Answering individual questions via email is not a good way for me to spend my time.

I get to use that signature about 5 times a day (I really try not to answer emailed questions since it just seems to lead to – well, more emailed questions). Before I started using it, I would tend to get flooded.

But I really like the “Thanksno.com” idea. I’ll have to use that on other types of emails.
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16 Comments:

Anonymous Kashif said....

In a similar vein, I remember reading about this website once somewhere:

http://www.googleityoumoron.com/

It cracked me up, but might be offensive to some. Use at your own peril...

Kashif

Fri May 26, 03:30:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Laurent Schneider said....

thanksno.com is much more polite than googleityoumoron :-)

Fri May 26, 04:58:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Laurent Schneider said....

I will send this to my relatives next time I receive a mail requesting to forward it to 10 people immediatly to get big luck, love, money and happiness... I hope it will work :-)

Fri May 26, 05:01:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Tom,
Irrelavant as it seems to be here,, but thought this news item about Oracle is surprising

Oracle Chief Security Officer Mary Ann Davidson has hit out at an industry in which "most software people are not trained to think in terms of safety, security and reliability." Instead, they are wedded to a culture of "patch, patch, patch," at a cost to businesses of $59 billion, she said.

To read more, click here http://news.com.com/Oracle+exec+hits+out+at+patch+mentality/2100-7355_3-6077349.html

Fri May 26, 05:14:00 PM EDT  

Blogger jimk said....

I heard Ms. Davidson speak at PSOUG Oracle Day about computer and software security. It was a rather sobering and enlightening talk. She certainly seems to know her stuff. One point that really stood out is the lack of training programmers recieve about security in college. (She was quick to point out that some college programs are good at covering this issue, but most weren't. She did give Kudos to those she thought were effective at addressing the issue.)

She seemed rather passonate about her job. (That's a compliment.)

Fri May 26, 06:53:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

but thought this news item about Oracle is surprising

What is surprising - I've said very similar things (not just about security, about SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT in general) myself?

I've used a bridge and civil engineer analogy many times myself. How I will drive across bridges developed by certified civil engineers - but still hit the save button every other word in a text editor (as I've been burned many a time).

So - I'm surprised as to what the surprise is?

Fri May 26, 09:42:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Surprise!

Fri May 26, 11:49:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous David Weigel said....

Anonymous, I thought you were gonna link to this.

Sat May 27, 12:02:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Maybe the surprise is how frank Davidson was about it. But she is absolutely right. The level in our industry is way below what you see elsewhere. Aviation for instance, any glitch is investigated. But in IT: "yeah, that is a known bug, you can safely ignore that error message"

Sat May 27, 12:37:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

...or the surprise could just be that Ann Davidson was comparing bridges and oracle.. not any other software. and heck, she says it while holding an executive position in Oracle....it is like the President of United States saying the country is in a bad shape,,not the world.

this ain't look like a talk around the cooler.

Sat May 27, 08:04:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

or the surprise could just be that Ann Davidson was comparing bridges and oracle.. not any other software. and heck, she says it while holding an executive position in Oracle....it is like the President of United States saying the country is in a bad shape,,not the world.

this ain't look like a talk around the cooler.

Sat May 27, 08:20:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

I would much rather do business with a company that knows there are problems and is working to resolve them than a company that spews marketing BS and ignores the problem. I think it is refreshing Ms. Davidson is critical. (and has been for some time, not an attitude du jour) That gives me a warm fuzzy.

Sat May 27, 08:20:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

I intended to link to the tacoma narrows one, but the ice floe struck me as more apropro, since it was built as designed, rather than defective due to a mistranslation of a French "required" support as "optional."

Mon May 29, 02:06:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

For everyone that pointed to the examples that are so famous (in part due to their so "few and far between" nature), we all know about them (engineering failures) - answer this

- drive over a virtual bridge designed and built by software engineers and then fly across the ocean in a plane designed and built by the same. Oh, and you get to do the beta (someone has to be first)

- drive over a real bridge designed and built by civil and other such engineers and then fly across the ocean in a plane designed and built by the same.

Assume that if the virtual bridge/plane fails - you get to experience real effects of such a failure.

Mon May 29, 02:28:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Real computer related risks ought to be on your list of books, even if it is within your area of expertise. Or you could read the entire comp.risks archives online :-)

No need to have an artificial scenario - for many things, if your code has a bug, people die. I suppose this is why there are certain warnings on Oracle software.

The real issue is whether there is congruency between the risk assessment and the usage of the software. That's where most everybody falls down. Is something horrendous going to happen if someone doesn't think word processing software needs a tight risk assessment?

Mon May 29, 05:21:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Wollaton DBA said....

. . . and there was I thinking you were some sort of collective hive mind like the Borg out of Star Trek.

Wed May 31, 12:17:00 PM EDT  

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