Wednesday, August 31, 2005

New Orleans and surrounding area

I was just there, in June of this year.  It is so sad.  Watching CNN in Prague and it is the only thing on the news.  I cannot believe the shots I’m seeing.  They are describing roads I’ve been on, cities I’ve been in and they are unrecognizable.

20,000 people in the superdome.  By bus to Texas.  That is over 400 buses of people.  400.  Hundreds, maybe more didn’t make it through the flooding. I can only say “stunned”.

So much for technology.

My heart goes out to them down there.  I cannot imagine. Watching the people on TV is hard.

Hurrican Katrina relief, Please visit the Red Cross and give what you can. Oracle employees - Oracle will match your gifts - see www.easymatch.com/oracle for more details.

POST A COMMENT

52 Comments:

Blogger Niall said....

You're not wrong. bad times.

Wed Aug 31, 03:52:00 PM EDT  

Blogger chris dolan said....

What a tragedy! It will take time to rebuild, but wow! I was down there recently as well. Stayed at the Embassy Suites over by the Riverwalk, 15 minute walk to French Quarter (what great restaurants!). Worked over at University of New Orleans over on Lakeshore Drive on Lake Pontchartrain. Had lunch at the Acme Oyster House every day.

Wed Aug 31, 04:38:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Living in Houston it's hard knowing how close they are, but at the same time feeling helpless because it's impossible to reach them even if we wanted to.

Wed Aug 31, 04:38:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Pratap said....

Mumbai, Europe and now US. Next expected in Taiwan. This year is the year of floods (In northern hemisphere).

Wed Aug 31, 04:42:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous denni50 said....

it is a sobering and somber time across the nation.

as one mayor from Mississippi put it:
"it looks like Hiroshima and Nagasaki".

the destruction is mindboggling...I have never witnessed a natural disaster of this magnitude in this country.

feel so helpless all I can do is
donate money and blood.

Wed Aug 31, 04:57:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Rob H said....

Maybe its just me, but I'm not sure you can compare Hiroshima to this. They are very different in scale (of deaths and destruction) as well as cause.

Wed Aug 31, 05:13:00 PM EDT  

Blogger scubajim said....

It is a tragedy. We shouldn't compare it to Hiroshima or Nagasaki, that is truly underestimating the destruction and human toll that took place there.

What I don't understand is that I saw on the news before the hurricane repeated demands for people to evacuate the city. Why did so many people stay? This event wasn't like the recent tsunami that caught people unawares; this problem was broadcast on multiple TV, radio, newspapers, etc. Puzzling. Yes, they must be helped and it is a tragedy.

Wed Aug 31, 05:13:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Rob H said....

Yes, I wasn't trying to 'lessen' the impact or sadness of the event.

I think the really tragic part is like you said, they knew it was coming, but still stayed.

Wed Aug 31, 05:19:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Alberto Dell'Era said....

It will take time to rebuild

Don't even know whether it could be rebuilt, since many buildings, especially in the French Quarter, were historical ones - they'll never come back the same as before, and the same applies to the community of people. We've had disasters of the same scale here in Italy, and sadly, very sadly, that's what happened.

Wed Aug 31, 05:27:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Tim... said....

Regarding: Why didn't people evacuate.

Unfortunately humans have this habit of thinking they're bulletproof. By the time they realise the magnitude of the issue it's too late to do anything about it. Personally, I'd rather run and laugh at my over-reaction, than stay put and regret it.

The weather over the last few years has been totally screwy. I think Kyoto didn't go far enough, yet we still could get everyone to sign up to it. I guess we must be bulletproof!

Cheers

Tim...

Wed Aug 31, 05:36:00 PM EDT  

Blogger R Menon said....

"What I don't understand is that I saw on the news before the hurricane repeated demands for people to evacuate the city. Why did so many people stay? "

I think part of the reason is people unfortunately underestimate the "range" of miles up to which the storm can impact. Also, they may have perhaps evacuated many times earlier in a similar situation without any actual damage occuring to their part - so they tend to think they will get lucky again.

Wed Aug 31, 05:39:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

I wonder if they will rebuild it? Seems like an awful lot of water but people say once they get the break fixed in the levee the pumps can get all that water out in a few weeks. Does anyone know why Lake Pontchartrain is considered a lake? Is it connected to the ocean or not?

Wed Aug 31, 05:43:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Robert said....

some people are now calling the "big Easy" Poo Orleans...
>shakehead<

Wed Aug 31, 05:48:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Dilip Patel said....

"So much for technology"

well said Tom.

What is bothering me most is why were levees not maintained to be strong enough to protect the below level city?. Okay they were built long back and one had no idea city would be hit by hurricane of this big magnitude. But when everyone knew that the whole city is on ransom by these levees, couldnt something might have done? No technology exists in this mars and saturn age, etc?? How are we going to win star wars?

Sad indeed. My prayers with them all.

Wed Aug 31, 06:02:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Noons said....

"This year is the year of floods (In northern hemisphere)."

and here we are in Sydney, running out of water to drink - or anything else. Not fair! And I'm running out for the garden in the rain tanks!

Stunning images coming through the news channels on cable. Thank God the guys from NOAA could put out the warning in time for the majority to leave. I'd hate to see this happen in a city full of people...

Thu Sep 01, 12:09:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Matthias Rogel said....

It is *NOT* a tragedy

It is a damn human fault

Shit - everybody knows that such
hurricans are most likely caused by
the global warming.
Kyoto protocol tries to counteract this - not ratified by U.S.A.

that's what scientists tell the politicians since ages, isn't it ?

stop close your eyes
and stop tell about tragedies
- this one has NOTHING TO DO with a tragedy.

hopefully Mr. Bush and the American people will learn out of
this catastrophy
BUT
I don't believe.

Thu Sep 01, 03:34:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

So, hurricanes never happened before - interesting. I did not know that.

Weather was always mild in the past, I did not know that.

Sorry -- not going to debate global warming or not - but you are so totally wrong (in my opinion) when you say this is not a tragedy.

Don't forget, there were people there. Perhaps even people that share your opinion.

Trust me, this is a tragedy. Cause not withstanding. This is a tragedy.

I'm not saying what side of the global warming line I fall on, it is not *relevant*.

This is a tragedy.

Thu Sep 01, 04:48:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Martin said....

Although I agree that global warming is a point of concern you can never say this was directly caused by that. This *is* a tragedy no matter what the cause is. The people that lost their homes or were killed have nothing to do with kyoto.

Matthias, this is not an political forum, please go elsewere with your beliefs.

Thu Sep 01, 05:00:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Matthias Rogel said....

of cause it is very sad what happend
and it is a tragedy in the sense of
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=tragedy

(what I meant was the original sense of "tragedy", cmp. http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trag%C3%B6die
)

don't want to argue about that

my sympathy is with everyone who was
affected by this catastrophy

what I wanted to say:
believing that global warning is not relevant will give us humans - especially the U.S. - many more of
these catastrophies within the next years
(and scientists say, there strength will increase)

Thu Sep 01, 05:24:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

> Why did so many people stay?

Many people in New Orleans were too poor to be able to evacuate. No car, no cash, no credit cards - unless they had a relative living to the west and some way to beg for a ride, they were stuck. A point which is hard to understand I know.

sPh

Thu Sep 01, 08:16:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous European said....

> > Why did so many people stay?
>
> Many people in New Orleans were too
> poor to be able to evacuate. No car,
> no cash, no credit cards - unless
> they had a relative living to the
> west and some way to beg for a ride,
> they were stuck.

A point which is hard to understand
to someone living in a country with
a social system.

Thu Sep 01, 09:46:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Rob H said....

OK, I'm from Canada and we have a social system too. That doesn't mean everyone has money, nor does it mean that in an emergency, there are free buses to use.

I read that all the planes out of the city were full, so, people starting paying (thousands of $$$) to take cabs out. Then all the cabs were booked, so people started taking Limos!

How can people on social assistance compete with that? Maybe the real tragedy is that we couldn't help them get out.

Its very easy to sit on the other side and comment, you weren't there In the end people are dying, its sad when anyone (or anything) dies. We're all joined on this planet in one way or another. the loss of a tree, man, or animal effects us all.

As for the crazy global warming/kyoto flame, I'm not sure but at some point didn't the planet freeze over or something? I guess the dinosaurs drove too many SUV's

Thu Sep 01, 10:36:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Bill S. said....

I had heard that in the week prior to Katrina making landfall, that New Orleans residents were told that if they lacked the means to get out, they should contact the local police who would provide transportation for them. Not sure about how true that is, but I am absolutely astounded that we could send so much so quickly in the way of relief to India, and yet it seems to be taking days to get it to our own backyard. People in N.O. should not be dying because of a lack of food, water, or rescue personnel. It is unconscionable and unbelievable to me.

Thu Sep 01, 10:54:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

European said:

"A point which is hard to understand to someone living in a country with a social system."

It's all about priorities. The government is spending billions of dollars in Iraq killing people and creating a most horrible mess in the region.

Thu Sep 01, 11:25:00 AM EDT  

Blogger scubajim said....

Let's not have this degenerate into a political diatribe on either side. If Tom wants this to become a political forum then he can Blog about political issues and on those we can respond.

I think we can all agree on that these people need help, a lot of help. It is a tragedy and it is in some of our back yards.

Thu Sep 01, 12:00:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

European said:

"A point which is hard to understand to someone living in a country with a social system."

That is right. If this were a country with a social system, they would would have:

1. Called for an evacution.
2. The government would jump on the few means of transportation.
3. Everybody else would have been left to fend for themselves.

Remember, it's a big city with half a million people. A lot of people can't get out, some are not sure they want to get out, and a few would rather die than get out.

Thu Sep 01, 12:08:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

I agree that the Authorities could have done more to get the people out of there. But unfortunately that is how things work in this part of the world.. There were cops knocking every door and telling people to get out of the city (and ofcourse they were helping people who needed help) -but if you just said I dont know where to go or I dont have the means to go, there was pretty little an officer could do about it. Unfortunately, the "social system" which cares for the needy is just not there.

Sorry Tom, not in a political sense - only telling an opinion when the point came up. You are doing such a great thing by doing whatever you can to mobilize help for those who need it. Appreciate your efforts and hope we dont see such human suffering again atleast so often.

Thu Sep 01, 01:36:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Joel Garry said....

and why did so many people stay

Got some insight on this watching Los Angeles news stations. A reporter (actually, the "tech guy" who gives techie reports) was in NO for a family thing. When the hurricane approached, it took a sudden turn away from NO, so people in hotels (who tend to be middle class tourists) underestimated the risks. By the time they figured out they really should leave, it was too late. Then the levee break. "When the levee break, got no place to stay" says Mr. Plant. He watched looters nail the pharmacy across the street. Doctors in the hotel also "used" the pharmacy across the street for sick hotel residents. Frankly, if I had been stuck in an attic for days with no water or food and water coming up my butt, I would break through the roof and become a looter too.

He had to hitch-hike after getting transport from the hotel to the end of the dry roads, wound up phoning the TV station from a van driven by a volunteer. The other people in the van had been plucked from rooftops. He mentioned several people from LA that had asked him to tell relatives they were ok, but had no idea where they had been transported to.

But the risks were well-known long before this.

gsm cell service in socal is all messed up (for at least two days). Cingular told me it was because when all these people left NO, they started calling relatives, overloading the system and causing a dominoe effect because all the new routers use IPV6 and they haven't quite figured out how to prevent such outages. I don't know if that is true, since support people might be propagating myths or just saying anything to be "helpful."

Thu Sep 01, 01:42:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Peter K said....

It's a tragedy, no questions about it. Made even worse by the lack or delay by the authorities in responding. There are desperate folks who needs help but there are also very bad elements who took advantage of the situation. I read that there were 4 ER folks from Hawaii who were in NO for a convention and couldn't get out. They were stuck in the hotel with no water, food or electricity and had to begged/bargained for food. A can of coke costed them US$5 and two plates of rice cost them US$40. They contacted the hotel management to enquire about helping as they are trained paramedics but have not been utilized.

Let's us hope that help in whatever form will come in time for those who desperately need the help.

Joel Garry said...Frankly, if I had been stuck in an attic for days with no water or food and water coming up my butt, I would break through the roof and become a looter too.

There is a difference in looting to survive (i.e. for food and medication) but to loot for goods like high-end clothing, electronics, etc. is definitely a no-no.

Thu Sep 01, 07:45:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Tom - not only are you a really bright guy but your comments on this topic show you are a class act as well.

Thu Sep 01, 11:37:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Gary Myers said....

Bill S. said
"I am absolutely astounded that we could send so much so quickly in the way of relief to India,"

If he is referring to the Boxing Day tsunami, India did not accept foregin aid.

http://www.indianembassy.org/Speeches/3.htm

Possibly, he meant to refer to Indonesia

Fri Sep 02, 01:27:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Peter K said....

This is really, really, really bad. The situation seems to be getting worse and worse by the second. The authorities are unable to regain control of the city and it seems that there is no plan nor is there a coordinated effort. There were reports of folks dying in the Superdome but no one is able to do anything about it.

Money donations are great but it seems that the immediate and urgent requirements are the basics (food, shelter, & water). News media are reporting that all gun stores have been looted so there are a lot of armed criminals who are shooting not just at the authorities but also rescue teams.

Let's hope that the authorities can regain control of the city and get the folks out to safety before more people are killed.

Fri Sep 02, 02:16:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Thomas Kyte said....

I've had CNN on the TV in the hotel room every night this week and the scenes are just such that you look at them and say "this cannot really be happening".

But obviously it is. I agree with you Peter K.

Fri Sep 02, 06:12:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Doug Burns said....

What I've found upsetting is that the media organisations seem to be able to get their reporters to the heart of the situation more effectively than the relief agencies. If I'm seeing footage of a dead person covered in a blanket, can't something be done for them?

The whole thing is truly shocking, though. Rather than criticising or wondering why people didn't get out sooner, let's hope that as many people as possible can get out safely, soon.

Fri Sep 02, 07:11:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Bill S. said....

gary said:
If he is referring to the Boxing Day tsunami, India did not accept foregin aid.

http://www.indianembassy.org/Speeches/3.htm

Possibly, he meant to refer to Indonesia


Yes, thanks Gary - fingers faster than brain.

tom kyte said....
the scenes are just such that you look at them and say "this cannot really be happening".


Yeah, you guys have got it 100% right - I keep getting that deja vu feeling whenever I see a newscast.

Fri Sep 02, 08:20:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Rich vs Poor
As the extent of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation became clearer on Tuesday — millions without power, tens of thousands homeless, a death toll unknowable because rescue crews can’t reach some regions — President Bush carried on with his plans to speak in San Diego, as if nothing important had happened the day before.

Katrina already is measured as one of the worst storms in American history. And yet, President Bush decided that his plans to commemorate the 60th anniversary of VJ Day with a speech were more pressing than responding to the carnage.

A better leader would have flown straight to the disaster zone and announced the immediate mobilization of every available resource to rescue the stranded, find and bury the dead, and keep the survivors fed, clothed, sheltered and free of disease.

The ineffective leadership Bush exhibited in his first term, particularly in the months immediately following Sept. 11, 2001, has continued. In its place is a diffident detachment unsuitable for the leader of a nation facing war, natural disaster and economic uncertainty.

Wherever the old George W. Bush went, we sure wish he would go away.

Fri Sep 02, 09:11:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Dear Mr Bush,

Any idea where all our helicopters are? It's Day 5 of Hurricane Katrina and thousands remain stranded in New Orleans and need to be airlifted. Where on earth could you have misplaced all our military choppers? Do you need help finding them? I once lost my car in a Sears parking lot. Man, was that a drag.

Also, any idea where all our national guard soldiers are? We could really use them right now for the type of thing they signed up to do like helping with national disasters. How come they weren't there to begin with?

Last Thursday I was in south Florida and sat outside while the eye of Hurricane Katrina passed over my head. It was only a Category 1 then but it was pretty nasty. Eleven people died and, as of today, there were still homes without power. That night the weatherman said this storm was on its way to New Orleans. That was Thursday! Did anybody tell you? I know you didn't want to interrupt your vacation and I know how you don't like to get bad news. Plus, you had fundraisers to go to and mothers of dead soldiers to ignore and smear. You sure showed her!

I especially like how, the day after the hurricane, instead of flying to Louisiana, you flew to San Diego to party with your business peeps. Don't let people criticize you for this -- after all, the hurricane was over and what the heck could you do, put your finger in the dike?

And don't listen to those who, in the coming days, will reveal how you specifically reduced the Army Corps of Engineers' budget for New Orleans this summer for the third year in a row. You just tell them that even if you hadn't cut the money to fix those levees, there weren't going to be any Army engineers to fix them anyway because you had a much more important construction job for them -- BUILDING DEMOCRACY IN IRAQ!

On Day 3, when you finally left your vacation home, I have to say I was moved by how you had your Air Force One pilot descend from the clouds as you flew over New Orleans so you could catch a quick look of the disaster. Hey, I know you couldn't stop and grab a bullhorn and stand on some rubble and act like a commander in chief. Been there done that.

There will be those who will try to politicize this tragedy and try to use it against you. Just have your people keep pointing that out. Respond to nothing. Even those pesky scientists who predicted this would happen because the water in the Gulf of Mexico is getting hotter and hotter making a storm like this inevitable. Ignore them and all their global warming Chicken Littles. There is nothing unusual about a hurricane that was so wide it would be like having one F-4 tornado that stretched from New York to Cleveland.

No, Mr. Bush, you just stay the course. It's not your fault that 30 percent of New Orleans lives in poverty or that tens of thousands had no transportation to get out of town. C'mon, they're black! I mean, it's not like this happened to Kennebunkport. Can you imagine leaving white people on their roofs for five days? Don't make me laugh! Race has nothing -- NOTHING -- to do with this!

You hang in there, Mr. Bush. Just try to find a few of our Army helicopters and send them there. Pretend the people of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are near Tikrit.

Fri Sep 02, 09:33:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous denni50 said....

there is 90,000 sq miles of destruction and devastation spanning 3 states.local officials and state engineers had been warning the federal government for
a long time that New Orleans was a catastrophe waiting to happen. The governemnt chose to turn a deaf ear and slash the Army Corp of Engineers budget by 71 million,
and so here are facing a monumental disaster of unprecedented proportions.

the suffering, misery and desperation these people are going through is unimaginable.
many comments made "why didn't they evacuate?"...those left behind are the economically disenfranchised,elderly poor,infirmed with no means or resources,they are barely surviving in the best of times.

knowing the potential for disaster and the vulnerability of the city local and state authorities should have developed disaster and evacuation plans targeted toward these groups. mandatory evacuation should mean 'forced' evacuation with all available methods of transport...trains,buses,large military transport planes being utilized to get these most vulnerable people to safety.

we now have a half million of displaced americans, even those that did get to evacuate have no where to go.

I survived hurricane Isabel in 2003..had no electricity for 11 days..and I thought I had it hard...the area was hit hard with excessive damage to some areas but it was still habitable...city and state officials acted swiftly in restoring services and providing aid...I was lucky and am now so very thankful.

we are facing a societal problem of a magnitude in this country never before seen and in my opinion(not a humble one at that) this is right up there with Nagasaki and
Hiroshima with regards to the destruction and devastation.

Fri Sep 02, 09:56:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous denni50 said....

to anonymous above:

you echo the sentiments of many
americans.......

Fri Sep 02, 10:01:00 AM EDT  

Blogger scubajim said....

I think people are missing an important point. Regardless of the Federal government it doesn't look like the state and local government had sufficient disaster plans. It isn't like this area rarely gets hurricanes. why weren't the evacuation plans more robust. NO didn't suddenly go below sea level, it has been below sea level for decades.

The thugs didn't help by shooting at aid workers, helicopters etc.

Fri Sep 02, 11:13:00 AM EDT  

Blogger plasticpony said....

Every side you look at the situation it is a tragedy . Period.

Hurricane, flood, global warming, human fault, organization of rescue... add to the list what you like... it is a tragedy anyway.

I agree much with what my co-national Alberto says: It will take time to rebuild

Rebuild houses and rebuild people.

But the most important thing (for we who were lucky enough not to be struck directly) is to learn the lesson of what is happening.

Fri Sep 02, 11:48:00 AM EDT  

Blogger Joel Garry said....

What I've found upsetting is that the media organisations seem to be able to get their reporters to the heart of the situation more effectively than the relief agencies.

Now that Kurt the Cyberguy is back in the TV studio, one thing he said struck him about being there was how different the reality is from how it is being portrayed in the worldwide media. He got quite hot under the collar about it.

There isn't much a couple of cameramen and a talking head can do for thousands of people. Most of the ones who were there wound up pitching in.

Fri Sep 02, 02:06:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Vera said....

Anonymous said....

"Dear Mr Bush,..."

Yes! Thank you, you expressed my feelings.

Fri Sep 02, 05:18:00 PM EDT  

Blogger LewisC said....

I just wanted to get my .02 in here.

Anonymous already brought up why the levees weren't maintained. Bush and budgets. 20/20 hindsight but it still makes me mad.

Second is Kyoto. From what I have read about it, the US already has stricter regulations than most of what the Kyoto accord requires. The things we didn't agree to were hugely expensive and won't even be implementeed by most of the signees.

And where do you find "proof" that global warming is occurring or the global warming makes worse hurricanes. I've been reading that we are in a cycle and are compeltely on the predicted target.

And finally, why didn't people evacuate? 120,000 people in new orleans make less than $8000 per year. I don't know what is comparable in other countries but in the US that is not enough to live on, much less evacuate willy-nilly.

The evacuation order was given so late that many people did not even know the order was givien.

Second, education is minimal. A GED is considered advanced education in a lot of areas of New Orleans.

Trust of politicians and government in general is minimal in many neighborhoods.

Combine that lack of trust to lack of education to lack of money and you have exactly what is going on in New Orleans right now.

The sad part is the price so many decent people will pay for a lack of foresight by the people elected to be in charge. Local, state and federal failed. Are failing.

I read in one article (don't remember where) one of the pundits said that finding out on tuesday that you can't evacuate a poor population is too late. How true, how true.

The head of FEMA said they didn't anticapte lawlessness. What? Thirsty, hungry people who already live in abject poverty put in these conditions and he didn't see lawlessness coming?

Some of these idiots need to do jail time. They are in positions of public trust and were grossly negligent in carrying out those duties.

But that's just my opinion.

LewisC
http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/oracle/guide/

Fri Sep 02, 05:38:00 PM EDT  

Blogger LewisC said....

Tom,

Just wanted to clarify, when I said "you" in my response, I didn't mean you. I meant one of the people who posted a comment.

LewisC

Fri Sep 02, 05:46:00 PM EDT  

Blogger Tarry said....

So very saddening.I've worked in the Gulf for half a year and we used to ship oil from Gulf/Mexico/Venezuela to Houston/BatonRouge. I used to look out with dreamy eyes at that beautiful view. Never could imagine that people out there lived so helplessly/poorly and today in shame of being let down.

More saddening (to the point of disgust, astonishment, bewilderment) is the biased approach of the US government is making them look so weak.

There is no law and order in that place. The death toll is not even begun. No one (probably) even cares about the deceased.

We are living in more trying times than we can imagine. I agree partly with Tom on the technology front. We are moving rapidly in technological developments. People are willing to look at the vast space and spend all the energy looking for life forms but we have NO DRILL AT ALL for emergencies like these. The Weather is changing rapidly and getting fiercer.

God help us all.

Sat Sep 03, 07:06:00 PM EDT  

Blogger LewisC said....

This article by Anne Rice pretty much sums it up for me. BTW, I am a New Orleans native.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/04/opinion/04rice.html?ei=5090&en=ce2f33f8719dba9c&ex=1283486400&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=print

LewisC
http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/oracle/guide/

Sat Sep 03, 07:22:00 PM EDT  

Blogger LewisC said....

That didn't come out very good. Try this link instead.

Anne Rice

LewisC
http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/oracle/guide/

Sat Sep 03, 07:24:00 PM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

I guess Dubyah never listened to this great Zepplin song!

"When The Levee Breaks"
from Led Zepplin IV, 1971

If it keeps on rainin', levee's goin' to break, [X2]
When The Levee Breaks I'll have no place to stay.

Mean old levee taught me to weep and moan, [X2]
Got what it takes to make a mountain man leave his home,
Oh, well, oh, well, oh, well.

Don't it make you feel bad
When you're tryin' to find your way home,
You don't know which way to go?
If you're goin' down South
They go no work to do,
If you don't know about Chicago.

Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good,
Now, cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good,
When the levee breaks, mama, you got to move.

All last night sat on the levee and moaned, [X2]
Thinkin' about me baby and my happy home.
Going, going to Chicago... Going to Chicago... Sorry but I can't take you...
Going down... going down now... going down....

Tue Sep 06, 10:36:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous rita said....

Lewis R Cunningham says
...
Second is Kyoto. From what I have read about it, the US already has stricter regulations than most of what the Kyoto accord requires. The things we didn't agree to were hugely expensive and won't even be implementeed by most of the signees.

And where do you find "proof" that global warming is occurring or the global warming makes worse hurricanes. I've been reading that we are in a cycle and are compeltely on the predicted target.
...


hihi

Thu Sep 22, 03:52:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous wilma said....

"
So, hurricanes never happened before - interesting. I did not know that.

Weather was always mild in the past, I did not know that.

Sorry -- not going to debate global warming or not
..
"

hoho

Thu Oct 20, 06:34:00 AM EDT  

Anonymous Anonymous said....

Very Good article , this article make some interesting points.
Tactical Flashlights
r c helicopter
video game
Tactical Flashlight

Mon Jun 23, 02:30:00 AM EDT  

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